The Applied Choice Research Group (ACRG) at the University of Stirling Management School was established in 2019 to provide a focal point for the research interests of staff within the School’s Economics Division who work in various applied fields of choice modelling.

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The Applied Choice Research Group (ACRG ) specialises in the use of choice models to inform policy-making. Our research is underpinned by academic rigour. We apply cutting edge techniques and contribute to advances in the analysis of choices for real world problems.
               

ACRG focuses on a number of distinct and interrelated themes within the broad area of applied choice. We have particular expertise and interest in the following applied thematic areas.

Environment

Our research applies economic valuation methods to guide environmental policy.

Health

Our research utilises economic tools to advise policies to improve public health.

Consumer

Our research also covers consumer goods to provide guidance for policy and industry.

Meet the group

Director

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Danny Campbell

Professor of Economics

Researchers

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Seda Erdem

Associate Professor of Economics

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Tobias Börger

Lecturer of Economics

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Erlend Dancke Sandorf

Marie Skłodowska-Curie Research Fellow

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Keila Meginnis

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

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Valeria M. Toledo-Gallegos

Post-Doctoral Research Fellow

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Hanjin Li

Ph.D. Student

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Madalina Radu

Ph.D. Student

Selected recent publications by members

See more publications

Using stated preference valuation in the offshore environment to support marine planning

Using stated preference valuation in the offshore environment to support marine planning

This study presents valuations of components of marine natural capital that have hitherto been overlooked by the valuation literature. Using a discrete choice experiment, it values a set of ecosystem services linked to seabed natural capital in the UK section of the North Sea. The study focuses on offshore seabed habitats, using Good Environmental Status as a measure of seabed health, thus linking directly to management targets under the EU Marine Strategy Framework Directive. It considers how changing pressures on seabed habitats could affect marine industries and other ecosystems through trade-offs with (1) the contribution that exploitation of these habitats makes to the maritime cultural heritage; and (2) changes to the health of seabird populations. For seabed habitats and seabirds, the elicited values mainly represent non-use values for changes in the condition of natural capital assets. For maritime cultural heritage the valuation refers to the changed provision of this cultural ecosystem service. Results show that the public in England hold significant, strongly correlated, values for changes in the condition of offshore seabeds and seabird populations. Projected losses in maritime cultural heritage are found to lead to expected welfare decreases. Implications of these findings for marine planning and decision-making are discussed.

Impacts of host gender on Schistosoma mansoni risk in rural Uganda: a mixed-methods approach

Impacts of host gender on Schistosoma mansoni risk in rural Uganda: a mixed-methods approach

Globally, over 230 million people are infected with schistosomiasis, an infectious disease caused by parasitic helminths. Humans can get infected when they contact water which contains Schistosoma parasites. Although the disease can be treated with a drug, people get rapidly reinfected in certain high-transmission settings. Drug treatment alone may not be sufficient to eliminate this disease and additional interventions such as health promotion or improvements in water and sanitation need to be scaled up. To provide recommendations to these control programmes we carried out interdisciplinary research in Eastern Uganda to understand the influence of gender on schistosomiasis risk. We found that the water contact behaviour of boys and girls is quite similar, and we did not see differences in reinfection or genetic diversity of the parasite between boys and girls. Differences in water contact between genders is greater in adults, and further research is required for these individuals. In this setting, infection rates are high in school-aged children and there are no differences between genders. These results emphasise improved control efforts for all school-aged children in communities like these. Our interdisciplinary approach provided complementary findings. Such an integrated approach can therefore have more power to meaningfully inform policy on schistosomiasis control.

Payment and policy consequentiality in dichotomous choice contingent valuation: experimental design effects on self-reported perceptions

Payment and policy consequentiality in dichotomous choice contingent valuation: experimental design effects on self-reported perceptions

Although the contingent valuation literature emphasises the importance of controlling for respondents’ consequentiality perceptions, this literature has rarely accounted for the difference between payment and policy consequentiality. We examine the influence of the randomly assigned tax amount on consequentiality self-reports and their potential endogeneity using data from a single dichotomous choice survey about reducing marine plastic pollution in Norway. Results show that consequentiality perceptions are a function of the tax amount, with payment consequentiality decreasing and policy consequentiality increasing with higher tax amounts. We discuss the challenge of finding valid instruments to address potential endogeneity of consequentiality perceptions.

Does attribute order influence attribute-information processing in discrete choice experiments?

Does attribute order influence attribute-information processing in discrete choice experiments?

The existing empirical evidence shows that both contingent valuation and discrete choice experiment (DCE) methods are susceptible to various ordering effects. However, very few studies have analysed attribute-ordering effects in DCEs, and no study has investigated their potential influence on information-processing strategies, such as attribute non-attendance (ANA). This paper tests for attribute-ordering effects and examines whether the order of attributes describing the alternatives affects respondents’ propensity to attend to or ignore an attribute. A split-sample approach is used, where one sample received a DCE version in which the positions of the first and last non-monetary attributes are switched across the sequence of choice tasks compared with the other sample. The results show that attribute order does not affect welfare estimates in a significant way under the standard assumption of full attribute attendance, thus rejecting the notion of procedural bias. However, the welfare estimates for the attributes whose order was reversed and the share of respondents who ignored them differ significantly between the two attribute-ordering treatments once ANA behaviour is accounted for in the estimated choice models. These results highlight the important role of information-processing strategies in the design and evaluation of DCEs.

Non-monetary numeraires: varying the payment vehicle in a choice experiment for health interventions in Uganda

Non-monetary numeraires: varying the payment vehicle in a choice experiment for health interventions in Uganda

Schistosomiasis is a serious health problem in many parts of Africa which is linked to poor water quality and limited sanitation resources. We administered a discrete choice experiment on water access and health education in rural Uganda, focussing on interventions designed to reduce cases of the disease. Unlike previous studies, we included a payment vehicle of both labour hours supplied per week and money paid per month within each choice set. We were thus able to elicit both willingness to pay and willingness to work for alternative interventions. Respondents exhibit high demand for new water sources. From the random parameter model, only households with knowledge about water-borne parasites are price sensitive and exhibit willingness to pay values. Through a latent class model specification, higher income respondents exhibit higher willingness to pay values for all programme attributes; however, lower income participants have higher willingness to work values for certain new water sources. We found a shadow wage rate of labour that is between 15 and 55% of the market wage rate.

Recent talks

Identifying consideration sets through search and an implementation using Shiny

Building on ideas from optimal search theory and choice modeling, we develop a model that can jointly model the search and choice processes. We outline our experimental approach to get data to test our hypothesis using Shiny.

Sampling choice data from geo-referenced populations: issues to consider

We discuss the suitability of different samples for spatial choice data.

The use of latent variable models in policy: a road fraught with peril?

We consider the use of hybrid discrete choice models to inform policy.

A latent variable approach to investigate system 1/2 decision-making: evidence from a food choice and eye tracking experiment

We explore how front-of-pack nutrition labels influnce the adoption of systems 1 and 2 decision-making.

An information search approach to discrete choice analysis

In this paper we develop a novel model that explicitly considers the information search process.

Contact

Please address any general queries to the Director, Danny Campbell, using the following details: